Your Complete Guide on Crate Training a Puppy [During the Day, Night, Even If You Work]

LTHQ January 17, at 5: If only I could start over! Ian Dunbar is a veterinarian and animal behaviorist, founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers , and the author and star of numerous books and videos on dog behavior and training. I know where to put it during the day, which is where the family are. I tried searching it, but no luck. Initially have the pup lie still for a few seconds before letting him play again.

You can still crate train your puppy when you work full time, but you’ll need to do the training when you are at home to begin with. This is because early crate training involves leaving the puppy for very short periods of time, and because a small puppy can’t hold his bladder for very long.

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We all need a friendly face to come home to at the end of the day. A dog is a friend who is always there to greet you, play with you and exercise you. But not many of us can spend all day with our dogs, although it would be a great world if we could. We have work, school, family obligations, friends and other commitments in our lives. First, teach your dog that being home alone is okay. Every dog should be able to stay on his own all day without falling apart emotionally or becoming destructive.

Watch for potty accidents, too, as these will tell you how long your dog can be left without needing to go outside. You want him to think that being on his own is normal and safe.

Give him a treat when you leave but not when you return. Stuff a Kong toy with enough goodies to keep him busy for hours. Fill a puzzle toy with his daily ration of kibble so he has to work for his meals. But a word of caution: Never leave your dog unsupervised with a toy that could be chewed apart and swallowed. Before leaving your dog alone, make sure any toys in the environment are indestructible. Leave the radio tuned to a calming classical station or a talk radio show. Choose the station carefully.

Bartonella is a type bacteria that can be transmitted to cats, dogs and humans from exposure to infected fleas and….

Want to give your pup yummy, low-calorie treats? I think she learned quickly that barking would get her out ooops!! If only I could start over! Right now I sometimes leave her in the car crate for very short periods of times while I dash into the store to grab something, or use a public washroom while on the road.

I have started your protocol. I closed the door and set the timer for 7 minutes. I clicked and treated for random intervals of 5, 10, 15, 25, 30, 45, and 60 seconds, during this 7 minutes. I varied between being in the room and out of the room.

No barking and she just lay there and waited. I was nervous she would start barking at 60 seconds, but she was able to do it. So I wanted some more details on how to increase the time from 1 — 30 minutes. How many times should I practice per day? How do I practice this in the car?

Put her in the crate, close the back door of the car, do the timing thing, then open the back door of the car, click, open the crate door, and treat? And then close the crate door, close the car door, time, etc, and repeat? I know you say to put high value chew toys in there — If I do that, she will definitely chew on them and not be interested in the click-treat game. As you can see, I am really keen on getting this right this time around!

I know I should have practiced more alone-time for her from the very beginning, and this kind of crate training. But we did really well on some other things. Secondly, thank you for the positive feedback on the article! Always nice to hear: Some will go of their own accord and spend time alone for perhaps hours without being asked, others can be so attached to their owners that leaving them alone for too long too soon can lead to separation anxiety.

Some can progress very quickly, others need more time. I hear you when you say: But if they are happy spending 2 hours alone in the crate, adding 10s is pointless! So at 90s I would only add 10s for my next target, but at half hour I would feel happy to add 5 minutes. So try to make the max time increase by 10s each time until you get to about 5 minutes, then increase by 30s at a time until you get to 15 minutes, then increase by a minute and so on.

A bit of guess work and nothing set in stone, but small steps relative to the total time if you know what I mean? How many times should you practice each day? You might have to take a step back sometimes to shorter time periods if she starts to fail before progressing again.

But the sooner you get going the better. Check out this article for an overview of the process: So by teaching a bark on cue, then a quiet on cue, you improve your chances of success by asking for quiet and knowing that she understands the command. I think this will help in your situation. Finally, yes, your steps for training in the car sound good to me.

The same as you would in the house, just in a different location. Well, this method really works. Happy to report that working slowly and consistently really pays off.

I left the room and she chewed on those for about 8 minutes. When I heard her stop with that, I came back in, took the Kong away so she only associates the really good stuff being available when I am not in the room , and she lay down right away without a peep, and fell asleep.

She slept soundly in there for about 50 minutes. Once, she woke up and had a little scratch, and looked at me, but I just ignored her and she lay down again and fell asleep for a little longer. I waited for 5 minutes before letting her out.

Only two click-treats in that time. When I return, I take that high value thing away. I also realized that after a long walk to which we often drive to , I can leave her in the car in the crate sleeping for awhile because she always falls asleep in the car-crate after our long afternoon walk.

Before, I was driving home and then getting her up again and she would be tired but kind of energized again. Yesterday she slept in the car crate alone for 30 minutes, though I am sure she could have gone a bit longer.

I am not sure what her reaction would be. I wonder if she would start barking for me. What do you think? And would you do the same click-treat at random intervals in the morning when she wakes up? She wakes up between 6 and 6: Click-treat in the morning too?

I tried it this morning for 10 minutes. Or do puppies just wake up early and I can look forward to more sleep in the future??? Thanks for the suggestion about the bark-on-cue…. Great guide, best one out there for sure. If anyone is thinking about starting this I would really recommend it and just be patient and have trust it will work with practice. Just a quick question — I wanted to know what you would suggest for the morning.

She sleeps in her crate by my bed. This morning she woke up at 5: I ignored her, and she started to bark. Not too crazily, but she would bark a few times, stop and be quiet for a little, then bark some more. The other day I got up and did 10 minutes of click-treat for quiet, but this morning I just flat out ignored the barking. After she was quiet again for sometimes this went on until 6: She eats breakfast around 7: What would you suggest for the barking in the crate, first thing in the morning?

Ignore, or click-treat method? I need to eliminate her 8: YOU need to decide the time to get up, not your puppy, and if you let her decide even two or three times by you getting up and going to her she can learn to do it again and again. However, if the barking occurs on too many consecutive mornings even though you ignore her, that can become habit and a real problem.

There is a commonly offered way to address it…though you may not like the sound of it if you like your sleep…Get up BEFORE your puppy, before they have a chance to bark, so she learns she can get attention and your company in the morning without having to bark. You can then push the time out by a few minutes each day and expect her not to bark, until you reach the time after a few days that YOU want to be getting up and not her.

Quite a way down in the article, under the title: What if the dog never stops whining? They will associate the reward and being let out with giving you a sit or their attention on cue, they never get rewarded for crying. Have a quick read, it sounds fair advice to me.

I totally agree with you that you should stop her 8 o clock nap at night. I do understand you wanting quiet time, but putting her to bed rested not long after will be working against you. Try eliminating this nap so she is tired for bed, not well rested, while at the same time working on a method to cure morning barking.

Once the morning barking habit has been broken, you should be able to let her nap at night again. Have you followed a structured training program? You should try going a few steps back in the training above to a point where she is succeeding, then move forward again more slowly, not moving out of her comfort zone until she is ready. Some puppies can take many weeks of training before they are happy left alone crated. I work 8 hr shifts and wont be able to let him out for breaks during this time.

At what age do I take that space away? Also… is it bad to allow him to sleep with me and instead of sleeping in his crate at night? I cannot stress enough how important and beneficial this is to a dog and their quality of life. Finally, is it OK to have him sleep in your room? I know many people who have their dog sleep in their bedroom every single night; some sleep in a crate, some on the floor, some on the bed.

Both they and their dogs are very happy with it. So go for either never in your room, maybe now and then as a treat , or always in your room. Just got a 13 week old puppy 6 days ago.

While we have gotten to be more successful with nighttime crating, we just got a written notice that a neighbor complained about barking throughout the day while we are gone our apartment building is VERY tolerant of dogs so this stings a lot! We have a family member come halfway through my 6 hour day to let him out for a bit. Because he has improved a lot at night, I am hopeful that just a few days of daytime crate practice will be enough to stop the frequent barking.

But is this counterproductive? If your mum can take and train him while you work, this will benefit. BUT…it will help some, for sure, so carry on with the idea. Secondly, are you leaving him with any toys to keep him occupied? But he should have some comforting toys and chew toys to occupy him. You can try closing the curtains and shutting out any distractions from the outside world that might be making him either anxious or over-excited.

Also, I hear have never tried quiet and gentle music, or a TV on low — the volume people would talk at in your home — so he can hear sounds and human voices has a calming effect and quietens down a puppy. When a dog or puppy is comfortable in a crate, they are far more likely to relax and chill out compared to having more freedom in the house.

Look at points 5, 6 and 7 in this article: Also, as I mentioned above, train him being alone and quiet is the right thing to do. I will be getting a golden the end of Aug at 8 weeks old. Obviously my crate is an XL crate. There are also some dividers available on Amazon that you can find by clicking here. You will have to measure your crate and see if one fits it. If that fails, you could — depending on your skills — make a DIY divider with some board or chicken wire from a hardware store?

We want the puppy safe. Grizzly no longer uses the crate lol. I am loving all the ideas. My husband and I just brought home a chocolate lab puppy yesterday and he will be 9 weeks old tomorrow.

So he was in the kitchen — we took him out and put him down for bed at Once he was quite at 6AM I went to take him outside and he was up until we left for work.

The only accident was at 3AM and I think he was just excited to see one of us. Tonight we will set an alarm to take him out around 2: We are planning to crate train and the crate will be arriving today. We might not have a lot of time to get him to love his crate before closing him in it for bed tonight.

Or would you recommend putting the crate in the contained kitchen with the door open and let him go in it himself to sleep so he can get used to the idea of it? Any advice would be great! The thing with closing the door on him when crated at night before crate training is: They do not see this the same as being crated during the day.

Dogs do not generalize well, meaning things they learn and experience in one location or environment is not the same as learning or experiencing something in another location. So closing them in their crate the first night is almost always OK and will not damage your crate training. Many people do this. And of course blankets, a teddy bear for company and so on.

Hi , I really enjoyed your article. I have a question about crate training. I will let him out of the crate every 30 to an hour to go potty outside which he will do, but then I will let him play and he will potty again in the house , sometimes several times.

Am I suppose to immediately put him back in the crate once I let him outside? I hate to keep him in there all day for the sake of housebreaking him but when I do take him out he still does it in the house too.

Just wondering if I am doing something wrong. He is almost 11 weeks old. No, free time to explore and live life is important, so the idea is really to keep crating to a minimum if you can. Only popping him in when you know he is due to potty so you can prevent accidents and then take him to the correct spot.

A couple of things: An 11 week old puppy will often urinate after any excitement, so playing with him as you describe can lead to him needing to go again. Secondly, are you cleaning up thoroughly with enzymatic cleaners that truly eradicate any sense of the smell?

Using normal household cleaners works for us, but long after we think the area is clean there can still be traces of urine that is enough to make a dog want to urinate in the spot again. So make sure to clean thoroughly. If they have too large an area to roam it makes it extremely hard to prevent accidents. Perfect is a crate attached to a puppy play pen, or just baby gating off the rest of the house and keeping puppy in one room.

Fourthly is that even a word? As long as you are supervising him, catch him in the act, intervene and then take him to the right spot, then praise heavily when he goes there outside I presume?

You just have to make sure he is always supervised and every time he makes a mistake he is caught and redirected to the correct place. Any mistake not caught and he will think he has done the right thing pottying inside. He got rewarded by feeling relieved. Finally, if he is going incredibly often, more so than you think is actually reasonable or normal, he could have a slight medical issue urinary tract infection or other minor ailments so it might be worth seeing your vet, explaining the situation and having him health checked.

I found your blog very informative. However, she likes to plop down, and lay, and not go to the bathroom! It seems to be a routine more times than not, that we go outside and she refuses to walk.

Should I take this as a sign she does not have to go to the bathroom, and bring her right back in? She is very distracted and unless we are the only ones within her sight, she can not focus on doing her business. Any tips to reduce distractibility?

I have a very hard time deciphering whether she cries to be let out, or she simply wants out of the crate. Last night I went to the living room and spoke to her in a calm voice and she fell back asleep each time. Yet, somewhere between 2 and 4 am she went to the bathroom in the crate. My puppy is about 14 weeks old. I live in an apartment so i am worried about her barking and waking my neighbors in the middle of the night!!

What should i be doing?? Just take her to the spot and do nothing — Literally nothing, until she goes. Try extending the time between her bathroom breaks by 5 or 10 minutes. If it still occurs, extend by another 5 to 10 minutes until when you;re taking her outside she goes within a few minutes. But make sure she is on leash so cannot roam off, explore and get distracted. All you can do is take her on leash, not allow her to roam off at all, keeping her by your side until she goes.

Keep the leash VERY short so she really cannot move. Are you removing water a couple of hours before bed, and making sure she has a toilet break and is empty before bed? If so, she should be able to last the night at 14 weeks. I would say her crying — particularly as often as you say at every hour or two — is just to get attention.

Get up once during the night to take her outside for a wee. But once and once only. Ignore all other crying and she will eventually get the message that night time is for sleep. All this is covered in the crate training at night section above and should be applicable.

My 4 and a half month old puppy sleeps in his crate just fine. He wakes up a half hour before my alarm and constantly whines. I ignore him until my alarm goes off every morning but he still does this every day. Is there a way I can correct this behaviour? He definitely gets enough exercise and we take him out to pee pretty late and cut his water off early. So he learns he get released without whining, hopefully breaking the connection.

For example if he starts whining at 7am, get up and let him out at 6: Before he gets to whining. After a couple of weeks, try extending your alarm time forward by 5 minutes every couple of days. So look into doing both of these.

So I have a 9 week puppy and I work full time. Therefore, I have setup a play pen for him, placed the crate inside with the door open, placed puppy pad all around and left toy inside her crate. Should I play with my puppy while he is in the play pen?

At this point, I am not closing the door to his crate. Yes, of course, do play with your puppy. Spend as much time as possible playing with and interacting with him. When crate training a puppy is it ok to allow the puppy to take naps outside the cage? It seems that as a puppy he is falling asleep every couple hours specially if we exercise. When I go to sleep or out I do put him in the crate he cries for several minutes but then stops but when I am home I find him him napping outside his crate.

It will help familiarize him with it, build his confidence in it and so on. But yes, sure, let him sleep out of it too as long as you are there. Let me know if you need any further advice: We just brought home a 8-week old male yellow lab last weekend.

I wish I was able to get through your helpful resources prior, but just now reading entirely after the 3rd night. Hoping to train for nights and work schedules. Ideal as we are always crossing with only a few hours max of no one home. Spouse being gone 6p — 8a only a few days sometimes weekends with me home and needing to sleep til 2p or 4p depending on next shift.

We started off with crate in back room of house and doing things properly before bedtime, but woke up to his cries and let out for potty on first night.

Tried to tolerate crying for a couple hours and then moved crate to back room of house until 4 hours later waking up for day. Next night put in crate same place to allow to cry without hearing from bedroom accepting that he will cry at times. Wake up midway to take potty and do so as you advise. Wake up earlier in AM before work to potty, play, feed with mins interaction before placing back in same crate location isolated until spouse arrives home from work.

Not too much alone time as she stayed in same area until someone else came over at noon to spend time until wake up at 2. Rest of day good. Similar procedure as previous morning with 2hrs until spouse wakes up for day, but home all day. Crate trained for nights, isolated to back room during few days each week spouse has to sleep to allow room to play but able to potty train and not having pup cry so she can sleep, especially on weekdays I work and she has consecutive shifts.

As adult we will most likely utilize crate but want to allow free roam asap. Your end goals sound reasonable and easily achievable to me. Dogs are remarkably versatile creatures and will eventually slip into and live along with whatever schedules we create for them.

As long as their needs are being met for mental stimulation, exercise, training, food, water and sleep, they will fall into line with the work, play, exercise and sleep patterns we decide for them. So you should be fine! Lay out a plan, your training strategy, as close to a consistent schedule as you can…and then stick to it! Just stay consistent and yes, your plan sounds ok. Good luck…and if you do encounter any issues, feel free to check back and ask on anything specific.

I have been putting him in his crate everynight the crate is right next to my bed. He whines a lot and if I go and lay by the crate he will quiet down quicker and fall asleep for a few hours.

Should I not be doing this? Will he quiet down on his own? The first night I took him out every time he cried. That was about 4 times in one night. So his is not in there even 8 hours. How soon should I start moving it? I just recently got a golden retriever lab mix. Our first night was kind of an up and down for everyone. I tend to work early in the mornings, but one of the people I live with works in the evenings.

For now I definitely want her to learn that the crate is her safe place to rest rather than under the bed and get her started on potty training.

Ultimately though, thank you a lot for this article. This will help out a lot for both me and the puppy. Being consistent certainly can be hard, particularly when patience is wearing thin after sleepless nights! Hi i have read almost all you review in this website its amazing. Am bringing hom 40days old lab puppy in couple of days. I have the crate ready for him as per your suggestion. As per your article he is too young gor crate training or to use collar and leash. So it would be helpful if you can suggest me how to handle him till he reaches the rite age for crate training andwhere to put him skeep in the night.

Open place in my bed room or in a crate or in a box.?? Night After reading your website info , we borrowed a crate and put the it next to my bed in my room and set alarm to take her out for toilet breaks — Success!. Night 6 — Moved the crate to the hallway outside our bedroom door where she can still see us and all was ok the first night in this new spot a little crying but after shushing her wrong now I know she quietened down and went to sleep , did the toilet breaks, all good.

Night 7 — It was a warmer night, left the crate in the same spot in the hallyway, but she performed and carried on, whining, some barking but not much we did try and get her to quienten down wrong I know now but when other people are sleeping I guess its natural to do this She was also panting and breathing quite fast I understand the breathing fast and panting is something puppies do when sleeping??

I was worried about her breathing and panting so much I gave her a small drink incase she was thirsty so i sat with her probably wrong thing to do and she dozed off but she never settled into sleep- kept whinging and panting and chewing at the crate. So I moved the crate back next to my bed and got into bed myself.

I have been reading and reading your training notes and I want to get her back in the crate to sleep for the night so I can get her toilet trained ASAP! She goes in and out of the crate during the day so thats all good, its just the night time stressing me out. The nights since she has been sleeping in the bathroom downstairs on her own we sleep upstairs and she has run of this small room bedding on the floor crate is not in there with toys and paper for toileting on.

My goal is to get her back in the crate and take her to toilet breaks during the night again so I can get on with the toilet training, but not sure which way to do it. So do I sleep in another room downstairs for a week or so so he does not hear her whinging and crying and panting etc which I will ignore and gradually move the crate so she then ends up sleeping in the crate without having to be near me how long will this take?

Or can I alternate between sleeping with her in a room downstairs and then the next night I sleep back in my own bed and leave her on her own for the night but still do toilet breaks. Hoping you can offer some guidance. I am finding your website to be very helpful. I currently have a 7 week old puppy that I am trying to begin crate training. I am unable to click on your weekend training link, it just goes to the general website.

I tried searching it, but no luck. Yes, the link was broken. I have replaced with another link to the same information.

The link now works. Thanks for posting this simple step by step guide. I have a 16 week old Cockapoo and I felt I was loosing the good work already put in by the breeder. Reading your simple step by step guide, I was able to find the exact point I was at with the puppy and build upon it.

Thank you for the ever so useful information and your complete. I feel much more prepared for the puppy we are about to get next week! I am wondering if it is worth it to bring the puppy to work with me the first week s. How detrimental is this to it feeling safe and comfortable and how detrimental is this to crate training? So I say go for it! Our yellow lab is 18 weeks old and is crated. We moved the crate from our bedroom to the very nearby laundry room after we had him 2 weeks.

He sleeps between hrs a night. He cries and screams until we let him out when our alarm goes off at 5am! We used to get up several times in the night until our Vet told us he can hold his potty longer. We are trying to train him to sleep, or at least be contents, with staying in the crate for hrs a night.

Will this happen over time? A dog can certainly hold their bladder for 7hrs overnight. Their bodies slow down like ours do and they need to potty far less often than they would during the day.

Keep up with crate training, perhaps start training him to be happier accepting time alone and in time, yes, things should get better. I am a dog trainer of basic obedience for the AKC CGC program, a huge dog lover, and a firm believer in crate training, positive reinforcement, etc.

I also have a 5 year old male Boxer who is fully crate trained, but allowed to be lose in the house while I am gone at work. Puppy was so impossible at night that I have allowed her to be lose in my bedroom and she lets me know when she needs to go outside to potty. During the day though, that is not an option because I am at work. I go home on my lunch hour and clean up poop and pee, play outside with both dogs, and do the whole routine again when I come home from the office adding on a full bath due to her being covered in poop.

Sometimes a dog or puppy truly hates the crate, it can even go beyond that and they be truly phobic of it. It can be a real deep seated psychological thing, not just behavioral and sometimes far from easily remedied.

Are you in a financial position to be able to hire a professional dog trainer? The situation calls for an experienced hand to assess the situation properly — in person — and give advice that suits you and your specifically. I rescued an approximately 8 week old lab that was dumped this morning. After getting vet checked we decided to keep her. At 8 weeks though she is certainly ready to eat solid food and should be keen to. What did your vet say? My puppy just turned 3 months old and goes to her crate at night to sleep with no problems.

When I leave her in the crate during the day when I have to go to class she makes a huge fuss over it. She whines and barks very loudly.

Train her to spend time in the crate while moving away a short distance, then farther, eventually leaving the room. First for a second, then 5s, 30s, 3 mins, etc. Slowly, slowly, small steps at a time. Long-story-short, we have week Boston Terrier puppies, 2 male, 1 female plus 6 yr old neutered male Boston. We are crating them and that is going fine. My questions are how do you house break 3 puppies at once?

Do we need to use leash every time and take out separately? How long should they be in their crates since it is so much easier to keep track of them versus if they are left out of crates? We live on 30 acres and back yard is fenced. Housebreaking 3 pups at once is going to take some effort for sure! You need to take them out whenever they need to go, which will quite likely be different for each pup as they have different bodies and mature at slightly different rates.

Please read through them as all the answers are in there now. I have truly enjoyed reading your blog and have found it very helpful. I have an 8 week old goldendoodle who has done fairly well being acclimated to the crate and will occasionally go in it throughout the day; however, I have a few questions for you: Does it tend to make a difference if the two crates are different sizes, will I have to separately acclimate her to both?

Just minimize as much as possible is the goal. A puppy could be perfectly happy going into a crate in one room, while being apprehensive about a different crate in another room, because to them they are totally different things. So yes, acclimatize to both. We have are going into our third night tonight with our 8 week old lab. He is very receptive and enjoys being in his crate — this is his den, although I have been closing the door a few times throughout the day without much trouble at night he tells you exactly what he thinks.

Being mindful not to react to his cries, during the night should we be setting an alarm to create a toileting schedule to try and prevent any encouragement of his crying? He is very good at asking out day and night he is from my nephews litter and they have all been very good at toileting from around 6wks which is really helpful but with him being so against the door being closed — which I am going to work on using your plan — I wondered if an alarm might assist in this.

The crate is in the kitchen as this is where my sister in law had them in her house as well as outdoor kennel area during day. He went last night from pm — am this morning , night before pmam then 1am-6am however I wondered if a 2am alarm might aid things. Any advice is greatly appreciated. I advise setting an alarm, yes. I am getting a puppy soon, and will take the time to crate train slowly.

But what do I do the first few nights about sleeping? Hi, thank you for the best article I have read so far, and I have read a few! We have a 13 week Golden Doodle and are having trouble with sleeping at night. We have had him for four weeks.

The first night we brought him home we tried placing him in his crate at night in the bathroom upstairs. He cried solidly and we felt bad, even though the breeder said to leave him to cry. The second night we put his crate next to our bed and he slept perfectly. We made sure he was properly toileted etc before bed. We then took him to the vet on the third day to check him out, which was all good, and she said to put him in his crate in the laundry downstairs at night and leave him.

So, we did that and he cried again. We called her to discuss and she said it would take a few days and we should persevere.

We have tried for four weeks now and he cries persistently, especially from 4am until we wake at 6. We did try giving him a toilet break at 4am and putting him back in his crate, but it made no difference — he still cried until 6am. We ultimately are happy for him to sleep upstairs with us or the kids, once he is toilet trained and out of his crate.

Can we just move his crate upstairs now and let him sleep with us, as he sleeps through when we do. The rest of the time he behaves beautifully with a mix of time spent by himself in the garden, time spent in the house with us, playing, going on walks etc. A couple of times a week I take him to work with me and happily snoozes in the crate next to my desk. He is also very good in the car, and enjoys coming with me to take the children to and from activities — he sits quietly on the back seat, occasionally looking out of the window.

He is otherwise very easy going and placid — we are just having trouble with him being very alone at night. I would appreciate your suggestions about this. We got a beagle puppy when she was 6 weeks old and she is now 11 weeks. I was trying to leave her in her crate for 1 hour or 2 and it was going well for a while but now she cries for minutes until she falls alseep or sometimes she just keeps crying..

After reading your post I thought we may have gone to fast. I tested to see at what point she would start crying and that is when I close the crate and walk away. I was thinking of going back to steps 9,10, and 11 but how many times a day and for how long should I follow these steps? Also, I am home all day because I just moved and have not secured a job. Mark, I have a 10 yr old playful yellow lab and a newly acquired 6 mo golden retriever.

The lab has never been crated, but has been kenneled when we traveled. I am not sure about the new pup as she is a rescue. How would you suggest we do crate training? Do we do it for just the pup or start crating both of them. We have a doggie door which allows them to play and eliminate outside. Thanks for your response. Thank you for this! So, I have resorted to your puppy-proofed space with pads for now.

We have a 12 week old pup who sleeps through the night in a crate in our bedroom without any accidents that part is awesome. He does not, however, make it through even short periods in his crate in the basement he and our older dog have neighboring crates throughout the day without peeing all over it.

The space is just enough for him to lay down and turn around so he ends up laying in his pee til one of us comes home to give him a break we split up the day and he is never in for more than a couple hours at a time. I wish I had found it sooner!! However luckily, puppy is happily put in her crate after a totally mad hour playing with the other dog. We put her out for a wee and then into the crate for a nap with a blanket over as the other dog wanders around tormenting!! She is absolutely fine in there for an hour or so and when we hear the wake up sounds we let her out for a wee and all is well.

Obviously being labs they are food obsessed. So she does both. Purely from the excitement of seeing me and knowing food is near!!

Any tips on stopping her from essentially spraying me every morning? Hi I have an 11 week old female Lab pup who is doing very well sleeping at night in our bedroom still have to take here out for a potty break at this point but doing good. We are at the point of transitioning her to another room in the house I know the cries and whines will come and go but my questions is when it is time for the midnight 1am potty break if she is crying do I still go to her and take her out to do her thing?

Contradicts a bit, but is this the exception in this process, I guess is my question. I read the above on crate training a puppy for bedtime and it says to be silent and make no fuss which is what we have been doing already.

Just not sure how this will unfold with her being in a new room. My boyfriend surprised me with an absolutely darling 8-weeks old chocolate silver lab pup 5 days ago.

I just bought her a crate yesterday, and I was so glad to find your article. Day 1 down, and the little sweetie naps and rests in her crate of her own accord. Anyway, thank you for the very thorough and informative article!

Hi, I love your crate training article. However, i have never had to crate train while working all day without being able to get to the dog mid day to have them out of the crate. So what I did this time is I bought a Pen and I put the crate in the pen.

There is enough room for the crate and a wee wee pad. She uses the wee wee pad and sleeps and plays in the crate. She has no problem with the crate. So my question is, if she has access to relieve herself readily, how will she train her bladder to hold it? When I first got her almost 3 weeks ago, I had a liter mate of hers staying with me for the week and I took a weeks vacation.

They slept together all through the night. Then the liter mate left. She was waking up in the middle of the night i believe she was lonely and realized he was gone. Now she wakes up 2 times a night to go the the bathroom. My sister has one of her bothers and my boss has another. They both sleep through the night and do not wake too early. Any suggestions as to what I should do?

With Kind Regards, Laurie. Hi Laurie Your pup is actually being housebroken as she seeks out the potty pad and does not go to the bathroom anywhere else. You may have to start taking her outdoors after her evening meal to curb her frequencies doing the night. She has to get used to going outdoors and away from the potty pad. It iws more effective is you develop a routine after her meals.

Thank you so much for this article. My wife and I are about to bring home a 2-month old chocolate lab puppy.

We have never owned a dog and have no experience training one. We are planning to crate train though. Do we need to get up at intervals to let him out of his crate? Hello Patrick You can start with Potty pads if you plan on keeping the pup crated at night. You will have a crate large enough to have a separate area for the pads.

You can also take him outside after meals so he can go to the bathroom, this will also help in potty training and house breaking. Thank you very much for this amazing, helpful and easy to read set of articles. My boyfriend and I have recently welcomed two beautiful mini schnauzer puppies into our family, one female who is 5 months old and a male who is 3 months old.

We have struggled with the house breaking part of their training as we both work hours at a time, the puppies behavior has escalated from potty accidents to now destroying pee pads and anything they find, I should explain, when we leave for 3 hours at a time, they are left in an enclosed area of the house about 6 ft by 6 ft with their toys, water and pee pads, we also live in a small apartment on the second floor. We recently decided to crate train them since our ultimate goal is for them to be free in the apartment, be potty trained and only use their crate as their safe and preferred spot.

Though the articles were very detailed and extremely helpful I was left with a few questions in my specific situation. How would I go about training the two puppies?

Would it be appropriate for them to be trained at the same time and place, one puppy by me and one puppy by my boyfriend?

Pets Home Alone: What Do Dogs Do All Day?

If you’re expecting inclement weather, don’t leave your puppy alone outside. Go with her to her potty area and bring her directly back inside after she’s done. If your puppy suffers from separation anxiety and is a gulper (which means that she eats things she shouldn’t), crate or enclose her in a small space with a large bone and no. All owners find it occasionally necessary to leave their puppydog at home alone. So before leaving your puppy for long periods, you should teach him how to amuse himself appropriately when left. Am I a Bad Pet Owner If I Leave My Dog Alone for 10 Hours a Day? By Dr. Marty Becker DVM | March 9 That’s not to say you shouldn’t get a dog if you work — far from it. Start with just a minute or two and gradually extend the length of time as you become comfortable with his behavior while you’re out of sight. He can be in his.